The General Election: Who do I vote for?

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Did you know that your vote could change the outcome of the General Election? Because there’s a chance it could!

Here at Nerve, we understand that it can be hard to know who to vote for, and that is why we are here to help you decide and give you the best advice!

  • Firstly, the UK has a first-past-the-post system of voting. This means that the Candidate that gets the most votes in each constituency gains a seat in parliament. This is why you will always see a mixture of parties sat in Government, as they represent all constituencies around the UK. Therefore, keep into account how candidates are doing in your constituency, as well as how the party is doing nationally.
  • Secondly, remember, you are voting for policies and not people!
  • Thirdly, just remember to go and vote!

Candidates running in the Bournemouth area: 

Bournemouth East- 

  • Conservative- Tobias Ellwood
  • Labour- Corrie Drew
  • Liberal Democrats- Philip Dunn
  • Green- Alasdair Keddie
  • UKIP- Emma Johnson

Bournemouth West-

  • Conservative- Conor Burns
  • Labour- David Stokes
  • Liberal Democrats- Jon Nicholas
  • Green- Simon Bull

Christchurch- 

  • Conservative- Sir Christopher Chope
  • Labour- Andrew Dunne
  • Liberal Democrats- Mike Cox
  • Green- Chris Rigby

Read on to find out the policies of the different parties running in the GE:

Each Party’s main Policies:

Firstly, BREXIT

Conservatives: 

  • Leave the EU on 31st January as planned, and negotiate an EU trade agreement, with an implementation period of December 2020.
  • They aim to keep the UK our of the single market and any form of customs union.

Labour:

  • To provide a new deal within three months of coming to power.
  • To give the people the final say by putting out a public vote with remain as an option.
  • They also wish to rule out the possibility of a no-deal BREXIT.

Liberal Democrats

  • To revoke article 50 within hours of the party taking office.
  • Stop BREXIT and invest the £50 billion remain bonus in public services and tackling inequality.

Green Party

  • To agree on a delay to article 50 with a second referendum, and an end goal of remaining within the EU.

Brexit Party

  • to leave without a deal on 31st January, or to negotiate a few month’s delay in order to agree to a standstill.
  • This means we would continue trade with the EU whilst holding talks to lay out a permanent agreement.

UKIP

  • A complete and total withdrawal from the EU, regardless of whether we leave with a deal.
  • To fight for the UKs total independence from the EU.

Education:

Conservatives

  • Schools to receive an extra £7.1bn by 2022-23. Starting salaries for teachers will rise to £30,000.
  • Increased length of OFSTED inspections from two-three days in secondary schools.
  • The create a new National Skills Fund with £3bn, which will allow individuals and small firms to access training.
  • To launch 20 institutions of technology which will deliver science and engineering training.

Labour

  • Schools to receive an extra £10.5bn by 2022-23.
  • Teachers to receive a 5% pay increase.
  • Get rid of OFSTED and transfer inspection responsibility to a new body.
  • To put a VAT charge on private school fees.
  • Abolish tuition fees and bring back maintenance grants.
  • Give every adult a free entitlement of six years of study for qualifications up to level six.

Liberal Democrats

  • Schools to receive an extra £10.5bn by 2024-25.
  • Teaching starting salaries to rise to £30,000.
  • OFSTED to be replaced with a new HM inspector of schools.
  • Reinstate maintenance grants.
  • University mental health to be improved with ‘student mental health charter’.
  • To introduce a new ‘skills wallet’ for every adult in the UK.

Green Party

  • Increase funding in schools by at least £4bn per year.
  • To replace OFSTED with a new body.
  • Private schools to lose charitable status, with VAT also being levied on fees.
  • Scrap undergraduate tuition fees
  • Write-off existing debt for former students studying under the £9,000 tuition fee regime.
  • introduce a “capital expansion fund” for sixth form providers.
  • to spend £2bn on re-skilling people on decarbonising the economy.

Brexit Party

  • To “further expand parental choice”.
  • Scrap interest on student loans.
  • Abolish the target to push 50% of young people into higher education.
  • Scrap apprenticeship levy.
  • place a tax on larger employers to fund the development of apprenticeships.

UKIP

  • Increase school funding by £4bn per year
  • To encourage the establishment of new grammar schools.
  • Abolish the target to push 50% of young people into higher education.
  • To push for a variety of different schools in every area.

Health and Social Care

Conservatives

  • To bring in 6,000 more GPs and 6,000 more primary care professionals.
  • To deliver 50m extra GP appointments per year.
  • Invest an extra £34bn cash in the NHS by 2023-24, amounting to a 3.1% increase in spending per annum.
  • Create innovative medicines fund to combat cancer and autoimmune disease.
  • Creating a national child vaccination reminder system.
  • A pledge for 50,000 more nurses.
  • A pledge to treat mental health with the same urgency as physical health.

Labour

  • Increase NHS spending by 4.3% per year.
  • Create a public drug company to keep costs low.
  • Ban fast-food outlets near schools and crackdown on junk food advertising.
  • Offer free NHS dental check-ups.
  • Create a £7.2bn cycling and walking strategy offering free bikes.
  • Expand GP training places to provide resources for 27 million more appointments each year.
  • To pump an extra £1.6bn a year to ensure new mental health standards are “enshrined” in the NHS.
  • £845m into a new Healthy Young Minds programme.

Liberal Democrats

  • To inject £7bn a year into health and social care by putting 1p on income tax.
  • To invest a further £10bn capital money in hospitals and medical equipment.
  • A 1p increase to be added to income tax to ensure extra investment in mental health.
  • To introduce a maximum waiting time limit for mental health problems.
  • Restrict junk food marketing and bring in a new tobacco levy.
  • Produce a “national workforce strategy” to retain more NHS workers.
  • To move towards free end-of-life social care.

Green Party

  • To invest at least £6bn into the NHS each year until 2030.
  • To roll back privatisation of the health service.
  • To put mental health care on an equal footing to physical health care.
  • To offer “tailored and specific” provision for the LGBTIQA+ community.
  • Pump an additional £4.5bn a year to fund councils which will provide free social care to people over 65 needing support.

Brexit Party

  • Insists the NHS must remain “publicly owned”.
  • To rule our privatisation of the health service.
  • Re-open nursing and midwifery to recruitment without the need of a degree.
  • To usher in 24-hour GP surgeries.

UKIP

  • Demands education on nutrition and healthy lifestyles to be compulsory in school curriculum.
  • Abolish prescription charges in England, and scrap hospital car parking charges.
  • Encourage the recruitment of hospital doctors and GPs by waiving repayment of tuition fees whilst they work in the NHS.
  • To bring social care into the NHS budget.
  • To increase social care funding in England by £5bn.

Capital Investment:

Conservatives

  • Pledges to oversee an “infrastructure revolution for this country”, including heavy investment in railways, £29bn for road-building projects and spending £5bn towards ensuring every address in the UK has access to full-fibre broadband.
  • A £350m cycling infrastructure fund to be established.
  • HS2 to be placed on the back burner, due to reviews indicating costs could rise to £81bn for this project.

Labour

  • A 400bn national transformation fund, which includes infrastructure, railways, electric cars and low-carbon technology.
  • A pledge for full-fibre broadband to be available everywhere in the UK by 2030.
  • Railways to be brought back under public ownership in order to make fairs more affordable.

Liberal Democrats

  • To pump £130bn in the national infastructure.
  • Pledge to build at least 100,000 homes for social rent each year.
  • To convert trains to ultra-low emissios by 2035.

Green Party

  • To fund a vast capital investment programme worth £95bn, which includes building more zero-carbon homes.
  • To scrap HS2, and the money to instead be spent rail improvements.
  • Spend 2.5bn a year on cycle infrastructure.
  • To make all railway lines between cities electrified.
  • to make all railways publicly owned within 10 years.

Brexit party

  • To invest at least £50bn in local road and rail schemes.
  • To offer free “base-level” domestic broadband in deprived areas.
  • To scrap HS2 and use the money to invest at least £50bn in local road and rail schemes.

UKIP

  • To scrap major infrastructure projects such as HS2 and the expansion of Heathrow Airport.

Housing:

Conservatives

  • To introduce a new fixed-rate mortgage for first-time buyers.
  • Help to buy to be extended to 2023.
  • Rough sleeping to be abolished by the end of the next parliament, paid for by a new stamp duty surcharge on non-UK resident buyers.

Labour

  • To create a department of housing, along with new “use it or lose it” taxes on developers stalling housing developments.
  • 150,000 new social homes a year.
  • Rough sleeping to be ended within 5 years.

Liberal Democrats

  • Pledge to build 300,o00 new homes per year.
  • Control the right to buy to local councils.
  • Introduce a new “rent to own” model of social housing.
  • Increase council tax by up to 500% on second homes.

Green Party

  • To build more than 100,000 new council homes per year.
  • Energy-efficient heating upgrades for one million homes per year.
  • To build new homes to eco standards that use 90% less energy.
  • Solar panels and other renewable energy generators to be placed on 10 million homes by 2030.

UKIP

  • Introduce “controlled immigration” in order to reduce the demand for housing.
  • The building of energy-efficient, modular housing to be encouraged.

Whilst this is not an extensive list of the whole manifestos of each party, we hope this article has given you some guidance of who you should vote for tomorrow.

If you would like more information on each party’s manifestos, we encourage you to visit each one’s individual website for more in-depth information.

Happy Voting!

Sources: inews, Conservative party, Labour Party, Liberal Democrat Party, UKIP Party, Bournemouth echo