The Rolling Stones rock Cuba

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The Rolling Stones have rocked Cuba in front of tens of thousands fans with their special concert on Friday night.

The entire night in the Cuban capital Havana was as a historic moment in the country where rock music was banned for several decades.

As the communist government had banned Western rock due to being subversive and decadent, fellow fans had been forced to cover up their love for the type of music for years.

The free gig took place just a couple of days after President Barack Obama visited the country as the first US president to visit Cuba in nearly 90 years.

These following events can be considered as a time of transformation for the country and have been seen as the communist-run island opening to the world.

Fans varying from pensioners to teenagers had travelled to Havana from all parts of the country and queued for hours to get into the Ciudad Deportiva, the 450 000-capacity concert venue.

Photograph of the Rolling Stones in concert

Mick Jagger started the night with welcoming audiences in Spanish before kicking off the show with the 1968 hit Jumpin’ Jack Flash.

The song was special as fans had been sharing private vinyl records and risked being sent to rural work brigades due to “ideological revolution” when Stones music was banned.

The veteran band performed 18 songs, on stage for more than two hours, and Jagger spoke Spanish throughout the entire night.

The band had revealed the songs to be performed on their Twitter page based on the wishes of fans shared on social media.

These eagerly awaited hits included Honky Tonk Women, All Down the Line, Out of Control, Satisfaction and Sympathy for the Devil.

The Rolling Stones also released a short video where Jagger displayed the concert showcases times of changes in the country.

Cuban authorities told the media that at least half a million were watching on TV the first performance of Stones in the country.

The overall night was reported to be a massive success without any serious security issues.